Posted in assignment, Children, communication, enjoyment, Family

A View From The Bird House

life-experiences-quotes

I am taking a cue from Jeff Goins on this post. His challenge is to write something from a life experience and this got me thinking of all the different life experiences this Grama has had, and there have been many.

I am very much aware that people can have the same basic experience but have a very different view of what that experience holds for them, therefore reactions may differ.  As I share my experiences, I will be sharing my own “View From The Bird House”.

You see, my last name is Bird and has been since 1965 when I married the love of my life and so I have quite a collection of experiences, both good and bad, that I could write about. Some of them weren’t necessarily appreciated as much when I was younger but with age I’ve begun to see God’s wisdom and sometimes humor in bringing them and/or allowing them. Yes, for most wisdom, does come with age!

Some life experiences were amazing and some frightening; some brought dreams to reality and some turned dreams to nightmares. But I have come to realize that every experience had its time and place in my life, each one brought with it life lessons and greater wisdom. Each one had a part in making me who I am today and none of them slipped in without my heavenly Father knowing it was coming. Many of them caught me by surprise but not my Father.

Each experience brought wisdom. Wisdom for raising children, understanding relationships and what my part in those relationship were, especially my relationship with my husband. Most importantly it brought me, and still is bringing me, to a closer relationship with my God!

But enough of the deep-thinking stuff. I would rather share my favorite experiences, the ones that make me smile and even laugh out loud. Retelling those stories at family gatherings is one of our favorite things to do and when we do we laugh like it was just yesterday even though some of the stories are over fifty years old. Still, they bring on those deep-down-belly-laughing fits that bring tears to your eyes.

Love them!

Even though those experiences make us laugh hysterically now, at the time, we  seldom saw the humor in them. Yet over the years we,ve begun to see the humor in them, which by the way is another advantage to ageing.

One of the experiences that stands out in my mind the is an experience with our first-born grandson who was four at the time. His mother had recently given birth to their second child and they were all visiting at our home. Our daughter had gone to do something in another room and I was tending the kids.

Holding baby Sarah, I began a conversation that I would soon regret and never forget. I asked my grandson how he liked his little sister and reminded him this is the little baby that was in mommy’s tummy. His response blew me away and it was my first lesson as a grama about being careful what you ask a toddler.

He got very serious and looked me in the eye. With his eyes growing bigger he said; “I know and I used to be in my mommy’s tummy too!” Not knowing enough to quit while I was ahead I continued this “cute” conversation and it went like this:

Me — I know, what do you think it was like in there?

Grandson – Getting more serious and raising both arms in the air and making a big circle he said; “Grama, there was sperm everywhere and I was afraid, but they said”, as he changed his voice to a gentler tone, “Don’t worry little boy we won’t hurt you. We are going to help you get out of your egg. But then I got stuck in my mommy’s gina and they had to cut me out of her tummy, but my sister didn’t get stuck so she came out of mommy’s gina.”

I was speechless! And that doesn’t happen often.

I immediately called for my daughter and shared this revelation that her son had shared with me. Her explanation was that she and her husband had been watching a program called Nova a few days before and it was showing microscopic films of sperm traveling to the ova, or egg, and how they penetrated the egg to release the embryo. Added to that; our grandson had been asking how his sister got out of mommy’s tummy and our daughter, believing you should use correct anatomical terms, explained in simple terms her birth. When he asked if he got here the same way my daughter explained that he had gotten stuck so they had to make a cut in her tummy to get him out.

That grandson was 32 this year and that story is still being told much to his chagrin. But he is a good sport because he understands. You see he has a little boy of his own now and already has some stories of his own to tell.

Lesson Learned by This Grama: 1. Don’t underestimate the ability of a toddler to put one and one together and get two. They are much smarter than you think. 2. Don’t ask a toddler questions unless your prepared deal with the answers. They share all freely! 3. Live in the moment and the experiences and look for the lessons they bring.

Author:

Retired registered nurse Commissioned minister in the Wesleyan Church Married to George Bird with 6 children, 15 grandchildren, 12 Great-Grandchildren, 3 foster sons and 5 foster grandchildren Hobbies are reading, writing, organizing events and short term mission trips.

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